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Journal of the

Bombay Natural History Society

O , S Jy'::

~’7 j

Vol. 68, No. 1

Editors

ZAFAR FUTEHALLY J. C. DANIEL & P. V. BOLE

APRIL 1971

Rs. 18 (Inland), 30sh. (Foreign)

NOTICE TO CONTRIBUTORS

Contributors of scientific articles are requested to assist the editors by observing the following instructions :

1. Papers which have at the same time been offered for publica- tion to other journals or periodicals, or have already been published elsewhere, should not be submitted.

2. The MS. should be typed (double spacing) on one side of a sheet only, and the sheets properly numbered.

3. All scientific names to be printed in italics should be under- lined. Both in zoological and in botanical references only the initial letter of the genus is capitalized. The specific and subspecific names always begin with a small letter even if they refer to a person or a place, e.g. Anthus hodgsoni hodgsoni or Streptopelid chinensis suratensis or Dimeria blatteri.

4. Trinomials referring to subspecies should only be used where identification has been authentically established by comparison of specimens actually collected. In all other cases, or where identification is based merely on sight, binominals should be used.

5. Photographs for reproduction must be clear and show good contrast. Prints must be of a size not smaller than 8*20 x 5*60 cm. (No. 2 Brownie) and on glossy glazed paper.

6. Text-figures, line drawings, and maps should be in Indian ink, preferably on Bristol board.

7. References to literature should be placed at the end of the paper, alphabetically arranged under author’s name, with the abridged titles of journals or periodicals underlined (italics) and titles of books not underlined (roman type), thus :

Banerji, M. L. (1958): Botanical Exploration in East Nepal. J. Bombay nat. Hist. Soc. 55 (2) : 243-268.

Prater, S. H. (1948) : The Book of Indian Animals. Bombay. Titles of papers should not be underlined.

8. Reference to literature in the text should be made by quoting Jhe author’s name and year of publication, thus : (Banerji 1958).

9. Synopsis : Each scientific paper should be accompanied by a concise, clearly written synopsis, normally not exceeding 200 words.

10. Reprints : Authors are supplied 25 reprints of their articles free of charge. In the case of joint authorship, 50 copies will be given gratis to be distributed among the two or more authors. Orders for additional reprints should be in multiples of 25 and should be received within two weeks after the author is informed of the acceptance of the manuscript. They will be charged for at cost plus postage and packing.

Editors,

Hombill House, Journal of the Bombay Natural

Shahid Bhagat History Society.

Singh Road,

Bombay 1-BR.

VOLUME 68 No. 1— APRIL 1971

Date of Publication : 15-9-1971.

CONTENTS

A note on P ter opus (Chiroptera : Pteropidae) from the Andaman Islands.

ByJ. E. Hill .. .. .. .. .. 1

Foraminifera of the Gulf of Cambay. By K. Kameswara Rao. {With 16 figures in two plates ) . . . . . . . . . . 9

Maturation and Spawning of Bregmaceros mcClellandi (Thompson). By

Arun Parulekar and D. V. Bal. {With a plate and three text-figures ) . . 20

Orchids of Nepal 4. By M. L. Banerji and B. B. Thapa . . . . 29

Food-Habits of water-birds of the Sundarban, 24-Parganas District, West

Bengal, India II. By Ajit Kumar Mukherjee. {With two text-figures) . . 37

A Review of the Recovery Data obtained by the Bombay Natural History Society’s Bird Migration Study Project. By D. N. Mathew. {With a text-figure ) . . . . . . . . . . 65

Eco-Toxicology and Control of Indian Desert Gerbil, Meriones hurrianae

(Jerdon). By Ishwar Prakash, G. C. Taneja and K. G. Purohit . . 86

The Thalassinoidea (Crustacea, Anomura) of Maharashtra. By K. N.

Sankolli. {With four text-figures) .. .. .. ..94

Random notes on Birds of Kerala. By M. C. A. Jackson . . . , 107

Studies on the freshwater and amphibious Mollusca of Poona with notes on their distribution Part II. By G. T. Tonapi. {With twenty-one figures in four plates) .. .. .. .. ..115

A Catalogue of the Birds in the Collection of the Bombay Natural

History Society 8. By Humayun Abdulali . . . . . . 127

The nesting of Pareumenes brevirostratus (Saussure), involving a primitive

form of co-operation. By S. D. Jayakar and H. Spurway . . . . 153

Triops granarius (Lucas) (Crustacea : Branchiopoda) from Tamil Nadu, and a Review of the Species from India. By P. J. Sanjeeva Raj. {With two text-figures) . . . . . . . . . . . . 161

Pteridophytic Flora of Kodaikanal. By S. S. Bir and Surinder Mohan

Vasudeva . . . . . . . . . . . . 169

Some Aspects of Bio-Ecology of Podagrica orbiculata (Motsch.) (Coleop- tera : Chrysomelidae) as a pest of Abelmoschus esculentus at Sehore (M.P.). By R. R. Rawat and R. K. Singh. {With two text-figures) . . 196

Asymmetry in Palm Leaves. By T. A. Davis, S. S. Ghosh and A. Mitra.

{With nine text-figures) .. .. .. .. .. 204

Reviews :

1.

Beautiful Gardens. (D.E.R.)

. .

.. 232

2.

World Wildlife. (Z.F.)..

.. 233

3.

Lac Literature. (N.T.N.)

. .

.. 234

4.

The Biocrats. (A.N.D.N.)

.. 235

5.

The Wealth of India. (D.E.R.) . .

.. 237

6.

Signals for Survival. (D.E.R.)

. .

.. 238

7.

Nature Conservation in Britain. (Z.F.)

.. 238

Miscellaneous Notes :

Mammals : 1 . A note on the birth of a Golden Cat (Felis temmincki) in cap-

tivity. By L. N. Acharjyo (p. 241).

Birds : 2. Occurrence of the Flamingo in interior Maharashtra. By S. M. Ketkar and Lincoln Gray (p. 241) ; 3. Occurrence of the Barheaded Goose, Anser indicus in Jasdan (Gujarat). By Shivrajkumar Khachar (p.242) ; 4. Note on breeding of Ruddy Shelduck, Tadorna ferruginea (Pallas) at Delhi Zoological Park. By J. H. Desai (p. 243) ; 5. The Pied Myna, Sturnus contra (Linnaeus) in Bombay. By N. J. George (p. 243) ; 6. Recovery of a Spotbill Duck {Anas poecilorhyncha) in U.S.S.R. {With a map). By (Miss) Shailaja S. Somane (p. 244) ; 7. Baya Weaverbird Nesting on human habitations. {With eight figures in two plates). By T. A. Davis (p. 246) ; 8. Recovery of ringed birds.

By Editors (p. 249).

Reptiles : 9. Testudo elegans in Western Rajasthan. By Ishwar Prakash (p. 273) ; 10. The catching of snakes. By Romulus Whitaker (p. 274).

Fishes : 11. New locality records of Horaichthys setnai Kulkarni, from Nar- mada and Tapti Rivers. By S. J. Karamchandani and P. K. Pandit (p. 278).

Mollusca : 12. On two Doridacean Nudibranchs (Mollusca : Gastropoda), from the Gulf of Kutch, new to the Indian Coast. By K. R. Narayanan (p. 280). Crustacea : 13. Biometrical comparison between Balanus tintinnabulum L.

and Balanus amaryllis D. ( With three text-figures). By Arun B. Wagh and D. V. Bal (p. 282).

Insecta : 14. A possible explanation of the peculiar accident to the Butterfly, Delias eucharis Drury. By E. M. Shull (p. 286) ; 15. A cure for wasp sting.

By Humayun Abdulali (p. 287); 16. A simple and convenient artificial nest for maintaining an ant colony in the laboratory. By A. B. Soans and J. S. Soans (p. 288) ; 17. A case of intergeneric competition and replacement in the Ants, Oecophylla smaragdina Fabricius and Anoplolepis longipes Jerdon (Hymenoptera : Formicidae). By A. B. Soans and J. S. Soans (p. 289). Coelenterata : 18. A new sea Anemone, Crihrinopsis robertii, (Endomyaria : Actiniidae) from Maharashtra and Goa Coast. ( With three text-figures ). By Arun H. Parulekar (p. 291).

Botany: 19. Caralluma edulis (Edgew.) Benth. & Hook: A new record for India. {With a plate). By M.M.Bhandari (p. 296) ; 20. Arthraxon dec- canensis sp. nov., A new grass from India. {With a plate). By S. K. Jain (p.297) ; 21. A new grass from India Arthraxon junnarensis sp. nov. ( With a plate). By S. K. Jain and Koppula Hemadri (p. 300) ; 22. The Taxonomic status of the genus Pongamia Vent. (Papilionaceae). By S. S. R. Bennet (p. 302)

Notes and News . . . . . . . . . . . . 305

Announcement . . . . . . . . . . . . 306

JOURNAL

OF THE

BOMBAY NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY

1971 APRIL Vol. 68 No. 1

A note on Pteropus (Chiroptera: Pteropidae) from the Andaman Islands

BY

J. E. Hill

Department of Zoology , British Museum ( Natural History)

A small collection of specimens of Pteropus from the Andaman Islands confirms the view that P. tytleri Mason, 1908 should be considered a sub- species of P. melanotus, and that P. satyrus Andersen, 1908 from the outlying island of Narcondam is also subspecifically related to melanotus rather than to P. hypomelanus with which it had been provisionally associ- ated hitherto, being linked to tytleri from the principal islands of the Andamans by specimens from the geographically intermediate island of Barren. Parallelism in colour variation is demonstrated between P. melanotus frpm the Nicobar and Andaman Islands and P. hypomelanus geminorum from the islands of the Mergui Archipelago.

Two indigeneous forms of Pteropus are listed currently from the Andaman Islands, namely P. tytleri Mason, 1908, described from Rutland Island and considered to occur throughout the major part of the archipe- lago, and P. satyrus Andersen, 1908 from the outlying island of Narcondam. Although the genus has long been known to occur in the Andamans, relatively few specimens have been obtained, ever since Mason (1908) made the first critical examination of Andamanese examples, recognising tytleri but with the exclusion of satyrus , described almost concurrently and of which Mason was clearly unaware. The current classification of the two forms is based on the classic monograph of the Megachiroptera by Andersen (1912) who placed tytleri in the melanotus group with melanotus from the Nicobar Islands, niadicus from Nias Island, off Sumatra, modiglianii from nearby Enggano Island and natalis from Christmas Island, south of Java, and who associated satyrus with the hypomelanus group, widely distributed throughout Indo-Australia.

i JOURNAL , BOMBAY NATURAL tilST. SOCIETY, Vol. 68 (?)

Chasen (1940 : 24*? considered the purely Malaysian members of the melanotus group to be subspecies of melanotus with the comment (p. 29) that although from P ter opus melanotus to natalis is a long stretch .... the appearance of the intervening forms provides sufficient grounds to justify the use of a trinomial.’ Following this lead, Ellerman & Morrison-Scott (1951 : 96) and later Hill (1968 : 3) listed tytleri as a provisional subspecies of melanotus. Ellerman & Morrison-Scott (p. 95) thought that from descriptions satyrus was very close to hypomelanusf of which they listed it as a provisional subspecies, a course subsequently adopted by Hill (p. 2). The relationships of the two forms are thus sufficiently uncertain that it is of considerable interest to report material obtained during successive visits by Mr. Humayun Abdulali to South Sentinel, Barren and Narcondam Islands in the Andaman Archipelago. The majority of these specimens remain the property of the Bombay Natural History Society, but the Society has generously agreed that duplicate examples should remain in the collections of the British Museum (Natural History).

Pteropus melanotus tytleri Mason, 1908

Pteropus tytleri Mason, 1908 : 162, Rutland Island, South Andaman Islands,

2?$ AN3, AN6, 1 immature? AN 5. South Sentinel Island, South Andaman Islands.

2<&£ 9/70, 11/70; 2?$ 10/70, 12/70. Barren Island, Andaman Islands. 30th April 1970.

Included by early authors with specimens from the Nicobar Islands as P. melanotus Blyth, 1863 or P. nicobaricus Zelebor, 1869, Andamanese examples were separated as tytleri by Mason [Dobson had earlier (1876 : 189) invalidly applied this name] chiefly on account of the sexual colour dimorphism which they display and which apparently does not occur in melanotus. Andersen (1912 : 227, 820) gave further descriptions of tytleri , pointing out (p. 820) that it could be distinguished from melanotus by its much darker underparts. Few specimens have been collected since Mason described tytleri and Andersen reviewed it : during the intervening years the holotype and one other specimen from the original material examined by Mason have been added to the collections of the British Museum (Natural History), together with two skulls lacking skins from Rutland Island and South Sentinel Island, and three other specimens, one of these from Port Blair, South Andaman Island, the others from Car Nicobar, all three coming from the Mason Collection but collected many years after his description of tytleri.

Males (B.M. 10.7.26.1, the holotype B.M. 13.4.6.6) from Rutland Island have the back and rump blackish brown, lightly streaked with grey, with a dark blackish brown head, sprinkled with a few grey hairs. The mantle is ochraceous buff and very clearly demarcated from the head and back. The ventral surface is dark brown or blackish brown and

PTEROPUS FROM ANDAMAN ISLANDS

3

lacks any paler mid-ventral area, which is represented only by a small area of hairs tipped with brighter chestnut brown. A young male (B.M. 13.4.6.5) from Rutland has a dark reddish brown mantle but otherwise exactly resembles the adult. A female (B.M. 13.4.6.7) from Rutland is uniformly dark both above and below, the mantle indicated only by a tinge of rufous. The two adult females from South Sentinel Island* collected by Mr. Abdulali, conform to the female from Rutland Island, but one (AN6) has a small mid-ventral patch of buff tipped .hairs, while the immature female from South Sentinel is exactly like the young male from Rutland except only for the presence of a similar mid-ventral patch. A female (B.M. 34.7.2.24) from Port Blair, South Andaman Island has the back more liberally streaked with grey and has a browner, slightly more prominent mantle than do females from Rutland or South Sentinel. A young adult male (B.M. 34.7.2.23) from Car Nicobar is similar in most respects to adult males from Rutland but has a brown head, lacking any grey, and the mantle is dark reddish brown, closely similar to the mantle in young specimens from Rutland and South Sentinel. This specimen, which lacks a skull, is from the Mason Collection and has been labelled 4 ty fieri by Mason. A second specimen (B.M. 34.7.2.56) from Car Nicobar is also from the Mason Collection and has been label- led ‘ Pteropus n. sp. 9 by Mason. It is an unmade skin in poor condition, with the skull in situ , and is very similar to the last but has a paler, more buffy mantle, a poorly defined buffy crown and nape patch and a small ochraceous mid-ventral area.

Mason (1908 : 163) remarked that tytleri occurs on Barren Island, where according to this author it shows a tendency to become smaller and to deviate from typical specimens by having a light and conspicuous oval-shaped area of greyish hairs occupying the chest and belly. The four specimens collected on Barren Island by Mr. Abdulali have the back and rump blackish, streaked with grey. The head and nape is similar in colour : a buffy crown and nape patch is present in males but not in females. Males have a prominent pale ochraceous buff or pale rufous mantle : in females the mantle is dark rufous brown or dark brown. The ventral surface in males is reddish brown anteriorly with blackish flanks and anal region but mid-ventrally is markedly paler, in one example (11/70) exactly like B.M. 34.7.2.56 from Car Nicobar, in the other (9/70) more extensively pale, the centre of the pale area becoming fawn to drab as in the specimens from Narcondam discussed below. Both female specimens from Barren are almost uniformly black ventrally, as in tytleri , the mid-ventral region bearing only a few ochraceous-tipped or rufous-tipped hairs. Specimens from Barren Island approach satyrus from Narcondam in some points of coloration, but are referred to tytleri chiefly on account of their larger size (Table 1) and especially larger teeth (Table 2).

Measurements (in millimetres) of adults of Pteropus melanotus from the Nicobar and Andaman Islands

4 JOURNAL , BOMBAY NATURAL HIST. SOCIETY, Vol. 68 (1)

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PTEROPUS FROM ANDAMAN ISLANDS

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(2*3)

6 JOURNAL , BOMBAY NATURAL HIST. SOCIETY, Vol. 68 (1)

Hitherto, large Pteropus from all of the Nicobar Islands have been referred to P. m. melanotus Blyth, 1863, with P. nicobaricus Zelebor, 1869 (the name in common use until Mason wrote in 1908) from Car Nicobar in its synonymy. Specimens from Trinkut and Great Nicobar are avai- lable in the collections of the British Museum (Natural History) and have been described in detail by Andersen (1912 : 224). They differ from P. m. ty fieri in having the head generally browner and less blackish grey, in the presence of a more evident reddish mantle in females and in a much paler and brighter ventral surface in both males and females : the paler area varies in colour from golden ochraceous buff to tawny, some- times medianly faintly drab. Such specimens have been presumed hitherto to occur on Car Nicobar, apparently since Mason (1908 : 161) examined the holotype of nicobaricus and associated it with melanotus. However, the two specimens from Car Nicobar examined during the preparation of these notes seem to link tytleri to melanotus. Both have brownish rather than blackish grey heads : one, a young adult male, (B.M. 34.7.2.23) has a dark reddish brown mantle and uniformly dark under- parts, while the other (B.M. 34.7.2. 56"! has a brighter mantle and ochraceous buff to rufous buff mid-ventral patch similar in colour to that of melanotus but less extensive. Comparison with the description by Zelebor (1869 : 11) suggests that nicobaricus may refer to such a specimen . . . . the throat, the ventral surface and the anal region dark blackish brown, the occiput, the nape, the sides of the neck and shoulders are a shining glossy reddish fawn with rusty brown border. The indi- vidual hairs of the glossy mantle are fawn at the root, glossy reddish at the tip with a golden lustre. The central part of the chest and the upper abdomen is blackish umber brown with fawn and glossy rust red hair tips.’ Clearly, the precise allocation of nicobaricus must await a re-examination of the holotype in the Naturhistorisches Museum, Vienna but in the meantime the close agreement in size between melanotus and tytleri, combined with a similar colour pattern which differs only in the greater degree of melanism exhibited by tytleri suggests that the two must be considered conspecific. There remains the possibility that pale- bellied melanotus may co-exist on Car Nicobar with dark bellied tytleri, a point to be resolved only by further collecting on that island or per- haps from the holotype.

Pteropus melanotus satyrus Andersen, 1908

Pteropus satyrus Andersen, 1908:362. Narcondam Island, Andaman Islands.

lc? 8/70 (AN 12) ; 3?? 5-7/70 (AN13-15). Narcondam Island. 29th April 1970.

As long ago as 1906 Osmaston noted (p. 622) of Narcondam Island Among mammals I found two species of Fruit Bats. The Nicobar Flying Fox {Pteropus nicobaricus) and another smaller species.’ Andersen, describing P. satyrus (which may be the Nicobar Flying Fox

PTEROPUS FROM ANDAMAN ISLANDS

7

alluded to by Osmaston) was evidently unaware of this reference and later (1912 : 142) suggested that the affinities of satyrus lay with P. hypome - lanus. Specimens obtained from Narcondam by Mr. Abdulali are similar in colour to the holotype of satyrus , with blackish back and rump overlaid with a sprinkling of grey, the head mixed black and grey, with a patch of buff on the crown and nape. The male differs from the reputedly male holotype in its much paler mantle which is greatly ligh- tened with buff to the bases of the hairs, in contrast to the dark chestnut mantle of the holotype in which buff based hairs are found only in its posteriormost part. The three rather younger female examples have the back and rump more generously sprinkled with grey than does the male specimen and the mantle is browner, largely lacking red, the individual hairs brownish to the base. In both male and female the anterior part of the ventral surface is reddish brown, the flanks and anal region blackish grey, with a paler mid-ventral brownish buff area, lightening to drab at its centre. These specimens are smaller (Table 1) and have smaller teeth (Table 2) than P. m. tytleri.

Andersen (1912 : 142) thought that satyrus was most nearly related to P. hypomelanus geminorum from the Mergui Archipelago. However, in colour, size and tooth dimensions it is linked to P. melanotus tytleri by specimens from Barren Island which although nearer to tytleri are nevertheless intermediate between the two forms, and accordingly satyrus is considered to be a subspecies of P. melanotus. It is worth noting in this connection that the combined colour variation of P. m. melanotus , P. m. tytleri and P. m. satyrus is closely paralleled by similar variation in the series of P. hypomelanus geminorum in the British Museum (Natural History) from the islands of the Mergui Archipelago, even in specimens of geminorum from a single island. For example, in a series (B.M. 23.1.6.13-20) from Malcolm Island, the back and rump vary from blackish brown in males to predominantly greyish in females : a similar variation occurs in the coloration of the head, sometimes with an extensive buffy suffusion of the crown and nape in males. The mantle in male specimens varies from ochraceous brown or dark rufous to blackish brown and in females from ochraceous brown to dark chestnut brown. The ventral surface in two males has an extensive paler median area exactly as in P. m. melanotus and yet in two other male examples and in two females is uniformly dark brown or blackish brown as in P. m. tytleri , while two further female specimens are more greyish ventrally. Similar variation is found in specimens from the other islands of the Mergui Archipelago and the similarity in colour variation suggests that possibly P. hypomelanus and P. melanotus are more closely linked than is apparent from Andersen (1912). However, the status of the poorly known P. famulus from Car Nicobar (thought by Anderson (p. 143) to represent hypomelanus) requires to be resolved before this point can be properly

8 JOURNAL, BOMBAY NATURAL HIST. SOCIETY, Vol. 68 (1)

determined : furthermore, niadicus from Nias Island and modiglianii from Enggano (where it occurs with a presumed subspecies of hypo - melanus, P. h. engganus ) are also poorly known and further specimens seem essential to any study of the melanotus group as it is defined by Andersen.

References

Andersen, K. (1908) : Twenty new forms of Pteropus. Ann. Mag. nat. Hist. (8), 2 : 361-370.

(1912) : Catalogue of the

Chiroptera in the collection of the British Museum. I. Megachi roptera. London.

Blyth, E. (1863) : Catalogue of the Mammalia in the Museum of the Asiatic Society of Bengal. Calcutta.

Dobson, G. E. (1876) : Monograph of the Asiatic Chiroptera and catalogue of the species of bats in the collection of the Indian Museum, Calcutta. London.

Ellerman, J. R. & Morrison-Scott, T. C. S. (1951) : Checklist of Palaearctic and Indian mammals, 1758-1946. 1st. ed. London.

Hill, J. E. (1967) : The bats of the Andaman and Nicobar Islands. J. Bombay nat. Hist. Soc. 64 : 1-9.

Mason, G. E. (1908) : On the fruit bats of the genus Pteropus inhabiting the Andaman and Nicobar Archipelago, with the description of a new species. Rec. Indian Mus. 2 : 159-166.

Osmaston, B. B. (1906) : A visit to Narcondam. J. Bombay nat. Hist. Soc. 16 : 620-622.

Zelebor, J. (1869) : Reise der Oster- reichischen Fregatte Novara um die Erde in den Jahren 1857, 1858, 1859. Zoologischer Theil. 1, (1), Saugethiere, 1-42. Vienna.

Foraminifera of the Gulf of Cambay

BY

K. Kameswara Rao1

National Institute of Oceanography , Bombay (With 16 figures in two plates)

[Continued from Vol. 67 (2) : 273]

Family Rotaliidae Subfamily Rotaliinae Genus Rotalia Lamarck 1804

Rotalia beccarii (Linnaeus) (Fig. 69)

Rotalia beccarii Brady, 1884, vol. 9, p. 704, pi. 107, figs. 2,3 ; Cushman, 1915,

71(5), p. 67, pi. 30, fig. 3; 1931, 104(8), p.58, pi. 12, figs. 1-7, pi. 13, figs. 1,2;

Sethulekshmi Amma, 1958, p. 73, pi. 3, fig. 112 ; Ganapati & Satyavati, 1958,

p. 110, pi. 5, figs. 122, 123.

Description : Test many chambered with both faces convex, all chambers visible on dorsal side but only those of the last whorl on ventral side. Outer whorl of eight to twelve chambers. Sutures on the dorsal side limbate, those on ventral side depressed. Umbilicus closed by a mass of shell material or umbonal plug. Wall smooth. Aperture a narrow slit situated on ventral side at inner margin of last chamber.

Diameter : 0’54 mm.

Locality : Stations A & D.

Distribution : North Pacific, Cebu, Philippine Islands, oflf Japan, Mediterranean and Red sea, British Isles, Ceylon coast and Arabian sea

Rotalia vemista Brady (Fig. 70 a, b).

Rotalia venusta Brady, 1884, vol. 9, p. 708 and 709, pi. 108, figs. 2 a, b, c; Heron- Alien & Earland, 1915, vol. 20, p. 720, figs. 15-22.

Description : Test slightly biconvex, compressed with two coils, the outer coil formed of eight chambers. Sutures slightly depressed and

1 Present Address : Indian Ocean Biological Centre, (National Institute of Oceanography), Ernakulam, Cochin-18,

10 JOURNAL, BOMBAY NATURAL HIST. SOCIETY, Vol. 68 (1)

distinct on both faces. Wall granulated on the ventral side. Aperture an elongate slit at the inner edge of last chamber.

Diameter : 0*14 mm.

Locality : Station D.

Distribution : South Pacific, Kerimba Archipelago and Arabian sea.

Genus Pulvinulina Parker and Jones, 1862

Pulvinulina concamerata (Montagu) (Fig. 71)

Rotalina concamerata Williamson, 1858, p. 52, pi. 4, figs. 102, 103 ; Pulvinulina repanda var. concamerata Brady, 1884, vol. 9, p. 685, pi. 104, figs. 19, a-c ; Pulvinulina concamerata Cushman, 1915, 71(5), p. 52, pi. 25, fig. 1.

Description : Test biconvex with six to eight chambers in final whorl. Sutures depressed on ventral side and limbate on dorsal side. Surface of test smooth on ventral side while on dorsal side ornamented with numerous rounded bosses.

Diameter : 0T3 mm.

Locality : Station D.

Distribution : North Pacific, off Japan, British Isles and Arabian sea.

Pulvinulina oblonga (Williamson) var. scabra Brady (Fig. 72)

Pulvinulina oblonga (Williamson) var. scabra Brady, 1884, vol. 9, p. 689, pi. 106, fig. 8 a-c; Brady, Parker & Jones, 1888, vol. 12, p. 229, pi. 46, fig. 5 ; Cushman, 1915, 71(5), p. 53, pi. 27, fig. 5.

Description : Test biconvex, chambers few about seven or eight in the outer whorl, the later formed chambers large in size and length. Peripheral edge acute, slightly carinate. Sutures somewhat depressed. Wall granular on the dorsal side and smooth on the ventral side.

Diameter : 0*38 mm.

Locality : Station C.

Distribution : North Pacific, off Philippines, Ceylon coast and Arabian sea.

Pulvinulina punctulata (d’Orbigny) (Fig. 73)

Pulvinulina punctulata Brady, 1884, vol. 9, p. 685, pi. 104, fig. 17 a-c ; Cushman, 1915, 71(5), p. 52, pi. 24, fig. 1,

F OR A M1NIFER A OF THE GULF OF CAMBAY

11

Description : Test planoconvex, chambers numerous. All chambers visible on the dorsal side but only those of the final whorl on the ventral side. Sutures limbate and curved above and depressed below. Surface smooth but the umbilical region somewhat granular. Aperture a curved slit on ultimate chamber.

Diameter : 0’26 mm.

Locality : Station C.

Distribution : North Pacific, Hawaiian Islands and Arabian sea.

Family Globigerinidae Subfamily Globigerininae Genus Globigerina d’Orbigny, 1826

Globigerina bulloides d’Orbigny (Fig. 74 a, b)

Globigerina bulloides Williamson, 1858, p. 56, pi. 5, figs. 116-118 ; Brady, 1884, vol. 9, p. 593, pi. 77, pi. 79, figs. 3-7 ; Brady, Parker & Jones, 1888, vol. 12, p. 225, pi. 45, fig. 15 ; Cushman,